Cary Neeper

Writer, Blogger, and Painter -- esteeming life wherever and whatever it might be.

Check out Critical Non-fiction for links to reviews in Goodreads.com

COMPLEXITY
Exploration of complexity, its indicators, embedded chaos, and value in human organizations.

Forty Years with Birds and Dogs
Care and Respect

Guest Blog from Mia Darien--Writing Suspense

August 11, 2013

Tags: Writing and Publishing

There are a lot of thin lines you have to walk when writing. At least, if you ever plan for anyone to read what you write!

One of those things is between complexity and simplicity. When you're writing for adult audiences, you don't want stories that are so simple that it sounds like a children's novel, but you also don't want it so complex that you confuse and lose your readers.

It's even more important when you're writing thrillers, suspense stories, or mysteries. I consider my Adelheid series to be suspense, which means that you need an intense series of events, a mystery to the tale even if you're not writing it as a mystery and leaving clues for the reader to pick up on. (more…)

Certainly Not Stagnation

August 7, 2013

Tags: Sustainability/Steady State Economics, Book Club Discussion

Brian Czech in Supply Shock talks about "stagflation... a combination of inflation and recession..." an impossible situation in the steady state, where production and consumption are held stable at the standard of living chosen democratically and debt is a thing of the past.
To quote Shawne in Conn:The Alien Effect, the third book in The Archives of Varok, to be released this summer:
"The steady state means time to conserve everything and keep everyone working, sharing work hours, sharing big items locally, producing energy locally. Some people even understand the need for selective technology and replacement-only reproduction." (more…)

Long-term Stability—Survival in the Anthropocene

August 7, 2013

Tags: Sustainability/Steady State Economics, Book Club Discussion

The –isms are irrelevant. Socialism, communism and capitalism are all growth economies—stuck on the belief that growth is a panacea for what ails our Full Earth. A new ecological, full Earth, complex economy needs to focus on the long-range future and make a stable (no-growth) economy the primary goal of all nations.


Some places have already arrived with the primary driver in place—human population growth at zero. For them the opportunity is ripe for another needed focus—converting to a debt-free economy. Only then can a society hope to secure its future. Only then can resource use (and production) be reduced to sustainable levels for all time.
(more…)

Emergence in Story and in the Hen House Flock

August 7, 2013

Tags: Sustainability/Steady State Economics, Domestic Bird Care, Book Club Discussion

Emergence in complex systems in defined as a group of things becoming something more than the parts of that group can explain. A complex system can be any group of things that interact in nonlinear (not straight or direct) ways with each other, like an organization of human beings or birds sharing a Hen House.

If the mission for all the employees of an airline is to get the traveler to his destination with the most comfort in the least time possible, but the employees insist on sticking to their job description, what emerges is something not as friendly as intended. In many businesses, producing a reliable product can be forgotten in the name of making a larger profit.

What you do as a group, not what you say, is what you become. The soul of the group emerges, like the Hen House flock of geese, chickens, and ducks. The rules are simple: move over when I come to the feed dish or the pond and let me have a turn. If you don’t give way, I’ll give you a gentle nip with my beak.

Your organization has labored over a mission statement. Finally, it says what you want it to say--more or less. It's a bit idealistic, maybe it's a compromise for everyone who contributed to the big sheets of paper you pinned on the wall, but it's done, and it sounds good. It embodies in words what you would like to see your organization be and do, at least how you'd like it to appear.

A year passes, and the mission statement still sounds good, but does it describe what the organization has become? Or is the Bottom Line, like the Stock Price, used as the measure of that soul? Has your goal been to make the best product possible or provide the best service, as the mission statement says, or has the goal really been to make the most profit possible, so the stock price will go up?

What you do, not what you say will define the organization's soul. It will emerge, based on how individuals in the organization relate, how each person looks at the whole operation as well as each member's part, how much feedback is allowed, how much communication happens, how free each individual is to do his best at fulfilling the mission. It's all in the books. Check out the work of Margaret Wheatley, Leadership and the New Science.

The Hen House gang knows where to sleep—turkey and hen on roost, geese below in the Hen House, little duck in the dog igloo, big duck in the nest box. At dusk. Not ten minutes before dusk.
2013 Nautilus Silver Award YA and 2012 Foreward Finalist Adult Science Fiction




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A Place Beyond Man
Authors Guild Edition 2011


The Oil Patch Project--Mystery team Cary and Don
See Oil & Gas tag above.